Cultural Booth



Cast Net And Dip Net

Overview

 Long time ago, villagers tried to utilize simple tools and adapted them for other uses as well as modified them to be more exquisite and usable. This artifact is called handicraft. Dip net, one of Thai’s handicraft, is a folk wisdom which is made by older people. To make this kind of net, people need a lot of expertise and experience. The uniqueness of Thai’s dip net is soft, flexible and eco-friendly.  

Materials and Equipment

1. Nylon tread
2. Round wood
3. Net needle
4. Bamboo
5. Plastic rope
6. Nails

Procedure

1. Put nylon tread in net needle.
2. Make a knot about 2-3 inches wide.
3. Fabricate until the depth appropriate.
4. Use bamboo to make dip net handle and the size determinant.
5. Compose the first bamboo handle in circle form by fasted it with plastic rope.
6. Nail the handle until it is tight.
7. Insert dip net in prepared size determinant bamboo.
8. Attach it with the circular bamboo handle by plastic rope.
9. Suture by using nails exquisitely.
10. Cut the plastic rope.
11. Check for the meticulous.
12. Put round wood inside to balance the weight.



Fried Bananas

Recipe Fried Banana

Materials and Equipment

- Bananas (8 fruits)
- All-purpose flour (1 cup)
- Coconut milk (½ cup)
- Cold water (¼ cup)
- Sugar (1 cup)
- Shredded coconut (1 cup)
- Roasted sesame (1 cup)
- Soda water (2 table spoons)
- Salt (1 tablespoon)
- Frying oil (2 cup)

Procedure

1. Mix flour, water, sugar, shredded coconut, roasted sesame, soda water and salt by adding one by one in a bowl and stir until smooth.
2. Dip lengthwise sliced bananas in to flour mixture.
3. Fry in heated oil using medium fire. Wait until golden and serve while hot.



Fruit Carving & Thai Decorative Flower

Overview Fruit Carving

 Fruit Carving is a very common technique in Europe and Asian countries, especially in Japan, China and Thailand. Many fruits can be carved, but watermelon, apple, pineapple and tomato are the most popular of all. In Thailand, fruit carving is a significant part of culture. Watermelon carving originated from the 14th century in Thailand during the Sukhothai dynasty. The annual Festival, Loi Krathong, which occurs every Full Moon of November where people in Thailand float lamps and lanterns down a river to honor water spirits.
 According to a legend, one of the king’s maids decorated her lantern with a watermelon carved with flowers designed to impress him. He was so pleased that he encouraged all Thai women to adopt the practice and it became popular since then. Thailand fruit carving features flower, birds and floral patterns “Fruit carving normally used to be side dish for eating and decoration.”

Materials and Equipment

Knife and Fruit

Procedure

1. Choose hard-shelled fruit such as watermelon and pumpkin, then carved the fruit in different patterns using Thai original template or other designs with some special skills for carving.

Overview Thai decorative flower

 Thai decorative flowers are normally used in Thailand’s prominent ceremony, especially Malai, Baci-Su -Kwan.
 Malai is a type of flower used in almost every Thai ceremony. For instance, in Buddhist ceremony to worship Buddha, in Father’s and Mother’s Day to show respect to benefactor. Some are used for car decoration and odor improvement.
 Baci is one of Thai decorative flowers used in Thai culture. Kwan is spirit that has been with us since we were born to protect us from any danger. Baci-Su-Kwan is a Thai ritual calling back Kwan.

Materials and Equipment

 Colorful and aromatic flowers e.g. jasmine, Ixora, and orchid"Fruit carving & Thai decorative flower showing Thai lifestyle especially meticulousness of Thais."



Giant Crisp Rice

Overview

 Giant crisp rice, a grilled crispy yellow rice sheet, is one of the most popular Thai traditional snacks, but its origin is still unknown.

Name in different regions

Northern: khao-kruab (ข้าวครวบ), khao-tuab (เข้าตวบ), khao-pong (เข้าพอง)
North-eastern: khao-poung (ข้าวโป่ง), khao-kheab (ข้าวเขียบ)
Southern: khao-kheab-neaw (ข้าวเกรียบเหนียว)

Ingredients

1. Raw sticky rice
2. Palm sugar
3. Vegetable oil
4. Boiled egg yolk
5. Water from washing rice

Procedure

1. Soak raw sticky rice with water from washing rice for 6-8 hours, then steam it until it’s soft. In the meantime, boil the eggs.
2. Pound the rice for 20 minutes. If it’s too hard, put more water in it.
3. Mix palm sugar and water from washing rice until the mixture is soft. Then, pound it together with prepared sticky rice until it is mixed thoroughly, then squeeze it for 5 minutes.
4. Mix the vegetable oil and yolk together, then store the pre-prepared sticky rice chunk in it.
5. Spread and knead 150 grams of mixture at a time, then divide it into five 50-gram pieces.
6. Piece by piece, roll the pieces onto a plastic sheet until it is 15 cm in diameter. Then, dry it under the sun for 1.5 hours on each side, then broil it.
7. While broiling, occasionally flip the pieces to prevent them from burning.
8. Now, this marvelous snack is ready to serve!

Additional information

 Griant crisp rice is a signature product of the Promsawan sub-district in Roi-ed province. The price is approximately 12.5 Baht per sheet. It can be found and bought throughout Thailand.



Kanom Krok / Kai Krok

Overview

 Kanom Krok and Kai Krok are two of the most popular Thai foods because they are easy to make. They use a mold to cook, which is a very common kitchen item in our country. This leaflet aims to tell you how to make these foods.

History

 Kanom means snack, and Krok in Thai means ‘mortar’, but Kanom Krok has nothing to do with mortar. It is called this because of this interesting love story;
 A long time ago, there was a man named Gati (in Thai, ‘coconut milk’), and he fell in love with a girl named Pang (in Thai, ‘flour’) who was the daughter of the head of the village. Unfortunately, the head of the village made his daughter marry a man from Bangkok. Gati heard about this news and was going to stop the wedding. The night before the wedding, Pang found out about her father’s plan to make a pit to trap Gati on the way from Gati’s home to Pang’s premises. To save him, she snuck out of her house to warn him. It was a dark night and Gati was on his way to see Pang as well. They saw each other from far away, and with so much joy Pang ran to Gati and fell into the pit. Gati jumped in after her to try to help her. However, Pang’s father saw only Gati fall into the pit, so they buried him right away. The next morning, the Pang’s father dug the ground wanting to see that his plan was successful, but what he saw was Gati and Pang dead in each other arms.
 The villagers knew about this sad news, so to remember Pang and Gati’s love they made a Thai dessert made of coconut cream and flour. They cooked it in a cast iron pan with small round indents in it. Then putting one on top of the other, they made making a whole. This was a symbol of the two of them being together forever.
 Now, Kanom Krok has been adapted to Kai Krok, which in Thai means egg.

Ingredients

1. Rice flour
2. Oil
3. Coconut milk
4. Sugar & Salt
5. Corn, Taro (topping for Kanom Krok)
6. Eggs (for Kai Krok)

Procedure

1. Mix rice flour and coconut milk together, then pour sugar and salt, into mixture.
2. Spread a little oil in a mold to make sure flour doesn’t stick to the mold.
3. Pour the mixture into the mold and add a topping. Then, wait for it to completely cook and enjoy!
4. To make Kai Krok, use only eggs instead.



Khanom bueang (Thai crispy crepe)

Overview

 Kanom Bueang is an ancient Thai dessert known as Thai crispy crepe in English.
It's a popular form of street food in Thailand.
 Khanom bueang are usually topped or filled with coconut cream, followed by sweet or salty toppings such as shredded coconut, Foi Thong (golden egg yolk thread), or chopped scallions.

History

 One of the stories appears in the book "Dhammaboodpadad" and it said that Khanom bueang came from India and Brahmanism in the Sukhothai period and so was brought to Thailand and was modified ingredients that may be different from the original ingredients.

Materials and Equipment

1. กระจ่าไม้ (Kracā mị̂) is kind of kitchen flippers
2. Spatula (kitchen flippers)
3. Food mixer
4. Pot
5. Pan

Ingredients

1. Ingredients of Khanom bueang flour
  3 cups rice flour
  1 cup mung bean flour
  1/4 cup jaggery
  2 eggs
  2 cups limewater
  1/4 cup salt
2. Ingredients of white egg cream
  1 cup sugar
  1 white egg
3. Foi Thong (or Golden egg yolk threads)
4. Shredded coconut

Procedure

1. Start with khanom bueang flour, mix all ingredients of Khanom bueang flour in a pot using food mixer until ingredients are homogeneous.
2. Mix all ingredients of white egg cream in a pot using food mixer until ingredients are homogeneous.
3. Smear the batter onto the hot plate to make a thin crepe.
4. Once the batter is set, fill it with a layer of Cream filling, then the Foi Thong filling, garnish with shredded coconut.
5. Fold the crepe in half while removing it with a kitchen flipper.



Omelet on Rice

Overview

 While eggs are very high in protein and choline, enough to be included in the meat section in the Foods Guide Pyramid by the USDA, rice also contains a lot of protein and water and has almost no fat at all. Olive oil used in for frying, too, contains vitamin E and K, and is very high in antioxidants.

Procedure

1. Whisk the Egg
  After the eggs are cracked opened, whisk the whole egg until it is thoroughly mixed and looks soft and bubbly. Any additions are encouraged (e.g. sausages, ham, pork etc.)
2. Prepare the Pan
  Put 1 to 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a pan, heat it until you can see some vapor, then pour in the prepared whisked egg.
3. Fry It Up!
  Use a spatula to flip the egg so that it is heated entirely. Different amounts of heat create different textures, so there are infinite possibilities!
4. Put It on Rice
  Cooked rice of course. Any more additions can be freely added, including vegetables, some sauce and, other Thai dishes.



Papayasalad

History

 Papaya salad was adapted from an ethnic Lao dish known as “Tam Som.”Thai people modified it by using papaya as the main ingredient. It was originated from Chinese-Lao ethnic communities living in the plain of the Chao Phraya river, is now central Thailand,
and where it became known as . . . Som Tam

Procedure

1. 2 cloves of garlic
2. 5 Thai chilies
3. 2 tablespoons shelled roasted peanuts
4. 1 tablespoon of fish sauce
5. 1/2 - 1 tablespoon of palm sugar
6. 1 - 2 limes 1 tablespoon of dried shrimp
7. 1 - 2 small tomatoes
8. 1 handful of slivered green papaya

Procedure

1. Peel and shave the green papaya
2. Pound the chilies and garlic cloves in a mortar
3. Add palm sugar, fish sauce, and squeeze lime juice into the mortar
4. Mix and pound the dressing
5. Add roasted peanuts, dried shrimp, and sliced tomatoes into the mortar
6. Pound the mixture for about 30 seconds
7. Toss in the green papaya shavings and mix

Different types of Papaya salad

Som Tam Thai – one of the mildest versions, where the dressing is sweet and sour.
Som Tam Boo Pla Ra – a very common version that uses fermented fish sauce and crab in the recipe.
Tam Ba – Literally translates to “jungle,” this salad includes all sorts of things, plus freshwater snails.
Tam Sua – version includes green papaya, fermented fish sauce, and rice noodles.



Thai Plating Basketry

Overview

 Various kinds of basketry made in Thailand are different in their identities by each region. Their characteristics reflect not only communities’ culture but also lifestyle and wisdom of the locals. Moreover, each basketry has distinct value in art and beauty which occurred from great willingness and heedfulness of creators who design and make them from their sophisticated intellect. By this meticulousness, basketry products are well-made, well-design, and can be use in daily life.

What is Klah?

 Klah (Schumannianthus dichotomus) is not well-known plant like others, but it is a highlight of our booth. It is Thai local plant found in a muddy environment near a pond in mangrove forest which can be used to produce a unique Thai mat.
   Now, let’s see how basketry are made.

Materials

1. Plant fibers:
 - Bamboo strips
 - Palm leaves
 - Klah leaves
2. Scissors
3. Knives
4. Threads
5. Ropes
6. Needles

Procedure

Palm hat
 1. Trim 24-36 palm leaves 3-4cm from the end (The trimmed leaves must have equal length).
   Place leaves into a circle in the certain direction with spacing of ½ of leaf width.
   Sew the circle of leaves at ½ cm below of the edge.
 2. Insert half of all leaves beneath the first leaves, then repeat this pattern for next leaves until
   we cannot continue the process.
 3. Squeeze the hat by using rope to strengthen the structure.
 4. Sew the hat from the center and then sew around the circumference of the hat.
Bamboo Basket
 1. Cut bamboo into 1 cm-width strips and 1 inch-width strips for basket edge and handle.
 2. Peel each strip by using a sharp knife and leave the thin and flexible part of bamboo strips.
 3. Weave the basket, starting at the base, by plaiting harder strips vertically with constant spacing.
   While softer strips are plaited horizontally.
   Repeat the process until the basket shape is consistent.
   Finally, plait 1inch-width strips at the top of the basket and the handle.
Klah mat
 1. Prepare Klah strips by cutting and drying under the sun.
 2. Plait Klah strips into checkered pattern.
 3. Sew or plait edges of the mat to make a perfect rectangle Klah mat.

It can be notice that all basket products have the same pattern which is cross or checkered-liked.







Cultural Booth